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Texas Denies Immigrant Children Their U.S. Citizenship

Maria del Carmen Ramos

Maria del Carmen Ramos

Birthright citizenship is a hotly debated topic. The United States and Canada are one of the few nations that automatically grant citizenship so expansively to children born within their borders. Anyone born in the U.S. is considered an American citizen regardless of whether the parents are U.S. citizens, legal residents, temporary visitors, or illegal immigrants in the U.S.   (more…)

USCIS Expands Definition of “Mother” and “Parent” Under the INA

Mechelle Zarou

Mechelle Zarou

The U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (“USCIS”) and the Department of State (“DOS”) have exercised their shared authority and collaborated in the development of a policy expanding the definitions of “mother” and “parent” under the Immigration & Nationality Act (“INA”) to include gestational mothers using Assisted Reproductive Technology (“ART”), regardless of whether they are also the genetic mother. (more…)

USCIS Now Using New Ink Color for Certain Documents Which May be Used for Form I-9

Mechelle Zarou

Mechelle Zarou

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (“USCIS”) has changed from red to blue the color ink it uses to stamp certain documents that could be used for I-9 purposes. This would be relevant, for instance, in a scenario where you have a high population of new hires that are refugees and they provide you with a refugee document. Reviewers should note that moving forward they may see government documents with stamps in blue, red and black ink and that, just because the ink color has changed, documents may still be valid. (more…)

The EB-5 Program: The Road to Citizenship Less Traveled

Maria del Carmen Ramos

Maria del Carmen Ramos

Bipartisan immigration reform in an election year? And it creates jobs without adding to the deficit? Too good to be true? Well, earlier this year, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt) introduced legislation—co-sponsored by five Republicans (Sens. Collins, Grassley, Hatch, Lee & Rubio) and three Democrats (Sens. Conrad, Kohl & Schumer)—to extend the EB-5 Regional Center Program for three years.[1] After several amendments, that legislation was passed unanimously by the United States Senate.[2] It later passed the House of Representatives by a 412-3 vote and was ultimately signed into law by President Barack Obama. The legislation, as enacted, extends the EB-5 Regional Center Program—which had been set to expire on September 30, 2012—for an additional three years.[3]  (more…)